The Rules for Making Tree Compost

When it comes to the contribution you make to your garden and tree grove, composting food and plant waste is about the single best thing you can do. When you recycle organic waste by adding it to the soil in your trees, tree grove and garden your efforts are sure to repay you in the form of a healthy and beautiful garden. And making compost is such an easy way to make sure that your organic waste stays productive, enriching the land instead of taking up more room at the landfill.

Now it might surprise you know that making compost, as simple as it is, can actually be done in many ways. And gardeners and arorists are often loyal to their particular way. You can even get all kinds of purpose-built equipment to make compost with. You can get a carpenter to come in and build screen bins to help you decompose compost in, or you could just do what comes easily and dump all the waste you find in one corner of your yard.

If you’re looking for the fastest way of making compost possible, you need to spread it out over as large an area as you can, and throw a bunch of earthworms all over the place to help hurry the process along. Basically, you can do your composting whatever method of composting you choose. But there are two basic factors you need to pay attention to.

The first is how much moisture your compost raw material has. The more constant moisture there is, the better microorganisms and earthworms will be able to get to work. But moisture isn’t the only ingredient needed here. Composting needs a steady flow of air, as well. Earthworms and bacteria need air to survive.

Did you ever read about how as a practical science demonstration scientists buried head of cabbage deep in a landfill for months and then found upon and digging it up in the end, that it was exactly the way it went in? Deep in a landfill, organic waste for tree care doesn’t have air or moisture to really decompose with. It might be a little difficult to believe, but when you keep something completely starved of air and moisture, it just stays it is.

Basically, you need to make sure that the material you expect to turn into compost for plants and trees has a steady supply of both. If you put too much water on your compost heap for instance, all of it will just stick together and keep air out. How do you make sure that your compost heap gets the air it wants?

You could do it by mixing straw in your compost heap. It’ll help hold things sufficiently apart so that air is able to circulate.